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Tascombe is the shallow valley by Cobbs farm. It runs from the high ground towards the east to Common Farm, north down to the river being crossed by the A31 and the B3047 at Cobbs farm.

Combe is obviously a valley; the Tas element is more difficult but could come from the old English tǣsel (a Teasel). Alternatively, Tas could mean convenient, advantageous, or useful. So either Teasel Valley or perhaps Convenient valley because of its proximity to Cobbs farm.

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Dairy Cottage, part of Bassett's Farm and next to Bassett's Farm Cottage has a single storey dairy wing to the rear and a service wing.

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It is possible that it could have been a baulk (bank) between furlongs of the pre-Enclosure open fields. these wide grassy banks were used as access to the individual strips of ground contained within the furlong, but this needs more research to identify exactly how Bishops Sutton’s Open fields were set out. The name Greenaway is found in several fields on the north side of the lane.

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Green Lanes are often very old trackways or paths dating back centuries. The lane runs east-west: the west end terminates at Bighton Lane on the double-bends below the railway bridge and the west end at North Side Lane to the north of the council gravel tip at Judds Corner. There doesn't seem to be any evidence in the form of hedge lines footpaths or crop marks of it originally going any further in either direction. it may be that it would either have been used to avoid the lower routes of the now B3047 and Water Lane which would have been harder to use especially in the winter when the springs would have been high particularly prior to the upgrading of the now B3047 to a Turnpike in the mid 1750’s.

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Taken from the bridge in Bighton Lane with The Blenheims Cottage on the left

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On the piers along the garden wall and the gateway to Bishop's Sutton Manor stand several stone Pineapples. The actual wall is listed grade 2, and dates from the 1700’s.
The pineapples were always said to show that the inhabitants of a house were supporters of Charles 1st and the Royalist cause. This is just a myth and the connection is probably if anything more to do with Charles 2nd as he was said to have been presented with the first pineapple grown in England in 1675 by his gardener John Rose as depicted in a painting of the time - although its doubtful that Rose could have grown one as this doesn’t seem to have been possible until the 1700’s.

The reason for the Pineapples is more likely a sign of status and hospitality. This fruit from the Americas started to arrive in Britain mainly from the 15th century as it was the only fruit that could survive the long sea crossing. It was a very rare and incredibly expensive item fetching up to £4000 each, and to have a pineapple as a centre piece on a table (not to eat just to look at) was the ultimate in social standing. In fact pineapples were rented out and were taken from house to house for parties to show guests how prestigious a host was.

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Bighton Lane

Bighton Lane

The Railway line opened October 1865 as the Alton, Alresford & Winchester Railway, which was run by London and South West Railways.

Bighton Lane

Bighton Lane

This stretch Obviously takes its name from the railway arch, lthough as kids we sometimes called the lower half up to the bends, Strawberry hill (because of the wild Strawberrys that grew there). The road has always followed the same course, but in the 1860’s the construction of the railway and the bridge which carries Bighton Lane over the cutting seems to have been raised up on an embankment from just above its junction with Green lane to just the other side of the bridge. This would mean that prior to the building of the bridge the descent would have been much steeper than today especially if you consider the ground level above the bridge and the ground level of the field below it.

Bighton Lane

Bighton Lane

A local name for the section of Bighton Lane from the double bends to the railway bridge/Arch, although some call the whole hill from North Street to the Railway Bridge Arch Hill.

Bighton Lane

Bighton Lane

The actual pound was only 4 Perches in area, and was situated next to Pound Cottage on its south side. It would probably have been enclosed with a brick and or flint wall with a gate onto Church Lane, or even a simple post and rail pen. In 1839 it appears the Pound Keeper living in Pound Cottage was a John Brumble. In the 1870’s there was also a Pound at Judds corner where the council tip is today.

Bighton Lane

Bighton Lane

The Pound was used to impound stray livestock cattle, pigs, geese, sheep ,etc. The strays were kept there for around three weeks until claimed by their owner and were released back to the owner when he had paid the impounder and the Pound keeper for the cost of feeding and watering, bedding etc. and the cost of any damage that the strays had done prior to them being impounded. If after the usual three weeks the animals had not been claimed they were usually taken to the nearest market and sold on to cover the costs.